Ukraine

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28 Apr: A pro-Russian bot network in the EU amplifies disinformation about the war in Ukraine

Since the beginning of the war in Ukraine, on February 24, a large number of accounts, whose main goal was to spread pro-Russian disinformation, were detected on Twitter. Many of these profiles are suspected to be bots, but a large part could also be managed by actual human beings that act coordinately to spread false or misleading narratives about the conflict.

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18 Mar: From COVID-19 denialism to pro-Putin hoaxes: the mutation of disinformation groups on Telegram in Spanish

From spreading falsehoods like “COVID-19 does not exist” or “vaccines carry killer chips”, some bad actors have turned quasi automatically to a full-hearted defense of the Russian attack on Ukraine based on disinformation. The largest Telegram pandemic conspiracy groups now defend Putin and his invasion. And they do so with hoaxes. At Maldita.es we are going to tell you how 10 of the most followed channels do it, all of them within 9,000 to 240,000 followers.

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02 Mar: The world map of disinformation about the war in Ukraine

In #UkraineFacts – an initiative led by the Spanish fact-checking organization Maldita.es, with the contribution of tens of signatories of the International fact-checking network (Ifcn)’s code – you will find out in which countries each disinformation content has been detected and access the debunks of the different fact-checking organizations that have investigated it.

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02 Mar: Ten tips to stay away from disinformation during the war in Ukraine

After weeks of tensions, on 24 February 2022,  Russian armed forces invaded Ukraine. As soon as the war  in Ukraine began, disinformation also started spreading: false images, decontextualized videos, or plainly invented pieces of information invaded the internet and, in some cases, ended up on traditional media channels as well.